This track focuses on methodological issues in contemporary philosophy and ethics of technology. We invite contributions that reflect on which methods or methodologies currently hold sway and how their possibilities and limits are to be evaluated. For instance, while much traditional ethics focuses on the individual, it remains questionable whether this translates to other agents (e.g. social groups, institutions, socio-technical systems), which becomes pertinent when considering the embedded values and moral properties of technological products and systems. We further welcome evaluations of how ethics, social sciences, and other disciplines (e.g. philosopohy of technology, STS, foresight analysis, critical social science, moral psychology, but also the design studies and the arts) can be fruitfully combined, for instance in analysis and assessment the societal impacts of technology. The latter may include reflections on transdisciplinary and collaborative methodologies and practices, for instance regarding forms of knowledge, ethical concerns, and ways of approaching these, both in terms of theoretical work and concrete case-studies. 

Questions include (but need not be limited to): 

  • Which philosophical and/or social-scientific methods or methodologies are relevant to the contemporary analysis of technology? 
  • How to consider ethics beyond the individual? Does a traditional conceptual focus on the individual seamlessly translate to groups, organizations, and institutions? 
  • What is an individual? How does it compare to supra-individual entities, both ontologically and in terms of moral standing? 
  • How (not) to engage ethics of technology in a transdisciplinary way, particularly in relation to controversial technologies? 

Track 6: Methodological Issues, Questions & Practices

Track 6: Methodological Issues, Questions & Practices

This track focuses on methodological issues in contemporary philosophy and ethics of technology. We invite contributions that reflect on which methods or methodologies currently hold sway and how their possibilities and limits are to be evaluated. For instance, while much traditional ethics focuses on the individual, it remains questionable whether this translates to other agents (e.g. social groups, institutions, socio-technical systems), which becomes pertinent when considering the embedded values and moral properties of technological products and systems. We further welcome evaluations of how ethics, social sciences, and other disciplines (e.g. philosopohy of technology, STS, foresight analysis, critical social science, moral psychology, but also the design studies and the arts) can be fruitfully combined, for instance in analysis and assessment the societal impacts of technology. The latter may include reflections on transdisciplinary and collaborative methodologies and practices, for instance regarding forms of knowledge, ethical concerns, and ways of approaching these, both in terms of theoretical work and concrete case-studies. 

Questions include (but need not be limited to): 

  • Which philosophical and/or social-scientific methods or methodologies are relevant to the contemporary analysis of technology? 
  • How to consider ethics beyond the individual? Does a traditional conceptual focus on the individual seamlessly translate to groups, organizations, and institutions? 
  • What is an individual? How does it compare to supra-individual entities, both ontologically and in terms of moral standing? 
  • How (not) to engage ethics of technology in a transdisciplinary way, particularly in relation to controversial technologies?