This track will focus on politics and technology. We invite contributions that relate (disruptive) technology and design to questions of democracy, deliberation, and security, as well as to issues in political economy like automated labor, alienation, and the meaning of work. Contributions focusing on legal and juridical aspects are also encouraged. Perspectives may include (but need not be limited to) political philosophy, critical theory (of technology); conflict studies, juridical theory, theories of justice, deliberative democracy, and design studies. 

Questions include (but need not be limited to):

  • How does disruptive (digital) technology help instigate or avoid socio-political tensions? 
  • How do disruptive technologies drive, mitigate, or change threats to national security? 
  • What kinds of (digitally mediated) deliberation and participation are more or less suitable to current technological issues such as climate change and (non)human enhancement?
  • How to understand the relation between disruptive (digital) technological systems and juridical systems? Do novel technologies (e.g. AI) offer solutions to flaws in juridical systems, or do they accentuate existing problems? 
  • (How) can disruptive technology such as initiatives in e-government and digital deliberation ameliorate and promote democratic principles and practices? 
  • Do new digital technologies call for alternative democratic theories (e.g. adversarial democracy, experimental democracy), and how to evaluate such theories?
  • Which ‘political’ design approaches foster “design for democracy” (e.g. critical, participatory, speculative, more-than-human design)? 
  • How to situate and understand the value and meaning of labor in light of automation on the one hand, and democratic principles on the other? 

Track 7: TechnoPolitics

Track 7: TechnoPolitics

This track will focus on politics and technology. We invite contributions that relate (disruptive) technology and design to questions of democracy, deliberation, and security, as well as to issues in political economy like automated labor, alienation, and the meaning of work. Contributions focusing on legal and juridical aspects are also encouraged. Perspectives may include (but need not be limited to) political philosophy, critical theory (of technology); conflict studies, juridical theory, theories of justice, deliberative democracy, and design studies. 

Questions include (but need not be limited to):

  • How does disruptive (digital) technology help instigate or avoid socio-political tensions? 
  • How do disruptive technologies drive, mitigate, or change threats to national security? 
  • What kinds of (digitally mediated) deliberation and participation are more or less suitable to current technological issues such as climate change and (non)human enhancement?
  • How to understand the relation between disruptive (digital) technological systems and juridical systems? Do novel technologies (e.g. AI) offer solutions to flaws in juridical systems, or do they accentuate existing problems? 
  • (How) can disruptive technology such as initiatives in e-government and digital deliberation ameliorate and promote democratic principles and practices? 
  • Do new digital technologies call for alternative democratic theories (e.g. adversarial democracy, experimental democracy), and how to evaluate such theories?
  • Which ‘political’ design approaches foster “design for democracy” (e.g. critical, participatory, speculative, more-than-human design)? 
  • How to situate and understand the value and meaning of labor in light of automation on the one hand, and democratic principles on the other?